All About Me

 

F.A.Q's

I thought I'd use this space to answer a few questions that I've been asked. If there's a question you'd like me to answer, you can email me with it and I'll answer it here if I can.

Question:
Why write gay romance?

Answer:
Because I can. <grin> Actually, I write m/m fiction because, while one hot guy is enough to curl my toes and melt my underwear, two together leaves me drowning in a puddle of my own drool which is probably the same reason you read it!

Question:
How did you get published?

Answer:
I wrote a story for a contest and placed third. That gave me the courage to write another story and submit to a publisher. Low and behold, they didn't laugh and point at me - they bought it. I've been writing ever since.

Question:
Why can't I find your books on my local book store shelves like Barnes and Noble?

Answer:
The answer is a little complicated. Sometimes you can find anthologies with one of my short stories on the shelves, depending on the publisher, and all my work is available online through Barnes and Noble, Borders, Amazon, etc. Getting them on the shelves is trickier. Most "big" houses, the ones who can afford to print a bajillion copies of a single title and store them in a warehouse, won't consider publishing gay romance - the official answer is that they don't think there's a market for it. Personally, I think that's a bunch of discriminatory malarky. Anyway, the small houses that will publish the genre usually work in print on demand, which means that when a order comes in, they print it. They can't afford to have a warehouse somewhere stocked with 50,000 copies of the book, gathering dust.

Mind you, print on demand is different from a vanity press. With a vanity press, authors pay to have their work put in print. This is not the case with my books. My publishers (all of them) pay for everything from the editing to the cover art to the actual printing. I receive royalties based on sales like any other author.

I digress.

The big box stores, like Barnes and Noble, won't deal with publishers who don't stock a bajillion copies of the book in warehouse. Again, in my opinion, a busload of crap. My reason? Check out your local box bookstore and try to find the Gay and Lesbian section. Usually, GLBT fiction and nonfiction, regardless of the genre, will be crammed together onto two little shelves labeled "Gay and Lesbian Studies" and wedged in between History and Philosophy somewhere near the back of the store. At my local Books-A-Million, they stocked the gay and lesbian books under Social Studies. I mean...honestly! What does that say about the way the chain regards GLBT literature? Gay and Lesbian Studies? Social Studies? WTF? Do you see any straight romance stocked under the label "Heterosexual Studies?" I think not. Once, I even found a big store - I think it was a Virgin Megastore - who stocked the GLBT books in the Psychology section!

Until the mindset of the big box stores and major publishers change, I guess most of my work will only be available through online ordering.

Question:
Where do you get your ideas?

Answer:
Everywhere. Literally. Story ideas, called "plot bunnies" by those in the know, can come from anywhere, at any time - in the car, in the park, at the library, at the gas station, at a fast food drive-through, from reader suggestions…anywhere and everywhere.

Question:

You don't seem to have a specific genre that you stick to - you write westerns, supernatural themes, and historical pieces…why not stick to just one?

Answer:
I have the attention span of a gnat. Actually, I like to read different genres, so why not write them? I think I'd be bored out my head if I were forced to stick to the same theme all the time. Although I must admit that most of my stories have an element of the supernatural in them, and almost all have threads of humor.

Question:

What's the difference between porn and erotica, and erotica and romance?

Answer:
Ooh, nice question. There really isn't a definitive answer. Everyone seems to subscribe to their own definitions. This is how I personally discern the difference between the three:

Porn is generally a story that gets to the good parts immediately, without any of the fuss and bother of plot or character development. In some circles it's referred to as "one-handed reading" - for obvious reasons.

In Erotica, the reader is introduced to the characters and their world briefly, and there is a plot - sometimes a very good one - and lots and lots of sex. I mean lots. As in, if these characters were real, live human beings, they'd be in the hospital suffering from exhaustion and contused, bruised, and over-used dangly bits.

In Romance , we're first introduced to the characters and their world, made to understand their foibles and predicaments, made to care about them. We're given world-building, character development, and a plot that makes us want to keep reading …and then we get to the good parts. Also, although it isn't required (see Riding Heartbreak Road, LOL), romance usually has an HEA - happily ever after.

There used to be a restriction against using "hard words" when writing romance, as if anyone who might read a romance would have such delicate sensibilities that they'd gasp and swoon if the author didn't use a euphemism but called it like it is. I think that's changing. I read a lot of GLBT and straight romance, and am seeing the use of "hard words" increasing. I don't hesitate to use these "hard words " ( you know the ones I mean - most of them have four letters and end with a "k" sound), and refuse to use euphemisms like "greased love pole" or "throbbing shaft" when writing. I mean, come on...they're having sex, not giving the car a tune-up.

 

Copyright© 2005 - 2013 Kiernan Kelly